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Winnebago's retro Brave motorhome

Winnebago’s retro Brave motorhome

Editor’s Note: The following is a blog authored by Nigel Donnelly and appearing in Practical Motorhome touting the ingenuity and retro feel of the recently introduced Brave and Tribute Class A motorhomes. To read the entire blog click here

In the car market, one way to ensure strong sales is to make people love the product. Thing is, that takes time to achieve. Love for something like a car comes over time, with good memories, reliability and other positive association. One way for a manufacturer to short circuit that is by introducing something unashamedly retro.

In the car market, the most obvious examples are the BMW Mini, Fiat 500 and the Volkswagen Beetle. In all cases, the manufacturers have revived all the positive regard and romance associated with older vehicles and transferred it to new ones. All three of those cars sell very well, and with the various options for personalizing them, with bright colors, stripes and so on, they are often pretty expensive too. But customers are happier to pay more for something they have fallen in love with.

I was recently at the National RV Trade Show in Louisville, Kentucky, and one of the most striking vehicles to be found anywhere among the 727,849 square feet of exhibition space is the 2015 Winnebago Brave and Itasca Tribute.

Students of the RV market may remember the vehicle which inspired this unashamedly retro bit of design. It is based on the iconic Winnebago ‘Flying W’ models of the 1960s and 70s, so called because of the large ‘W’ motifs on the flanks.

The new Brave and Tribute borrow the slabby styling of the original ‘Brave.’ Back when the Brave was current, the styling was conceived out of necessity, with the large expanses of flat aluminum, the simple radiator grill and flat windscreen glasses all making it cost effective and easier to produce. The pronounced prow above the windscreen and stubby nose are very distinctive styling cues, along with those striking side graphics.

To read the entire blog click here.