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Sales at the 50th annual California RV Show in Pomona might get a boost from gas prices, which declined for five consecutive weeks in Southern California, southern Nevada and Arizona.
The Pomona show, sponsored by the Recreation Vehicle Industry Association (RVIA), began on Friday (Oct. 11) and continues through Sunday (Oct. 20) at the Los Angeles County Fairgrounds, east of the city.
The American Automobile Association (AAA) reported last Tuesday (Oct. 8) that the national average price for regular unleaded gas was $1.44 a gallon, about 11 cents more per gallon than a year earlier.
However, regular unleaded gas in the most populous portion of the Southwest, while still above the national average, declined each week during the five-week period that ended Friday.
For example, in the Los Angeles/Long Beach area, as of Friday, a gallon of regular unleaded cost $1.563, which was 1.9 cents a gallon less than a week earlier, according to the Automobile Club of Southern California.
Although Friday’s average price for a gallon of unleaded regular in Los Angeles/Long Beach was 4 cents a gallon higher than it was a year ago, it was 6 cents a gallon lower than in early Setpember this year, the auto club reported.
Here are the prices for a gallon of unleaded regular gas as of Friday in other major metro areas in the Southwest:
• $1.629 in San Diego, down 1.2 cents from a week earlier. That is 4 cents lower than in early September and 4 cents lower than a year-ago.
• $1.626 in Santa Barbara/Santa Maria/Lompoc, down 3.2 cents from a week earlier. That is 8 cents lower than in early September and 3 cents lower than a year-ago.
• $1.458 in Las Vegas, down 1.5 cents from a week earlier.
• $1.383 in Phoenix/Mesa, down 1.2 cents from a week earlier.
“Despite threats of hostilities in the Middle East, we’re experiencing what would be typical for October, which is ample supply of gas and lower demand,” said Carol Thorp, an auto club spokeswoman. “It appears that at this time, regular market forces are having a greater impact on pump prices than war fears.”